Video: Help Me, Healthcare. I’m a Job Seeker

Here is another episode of the RightJobNow Report: “Help Me, Healthcare. I’m a Job Seeker”

Most healthcare career pages or sites assume that job seekers have perfect knowledge of their organization.

Regardless of the idea that the majority of your applicants may be familiar with you shouldn’t make any difference in how much detail you provide on your career site/page. You should treat every visitor as if they know absolutely nothing about you.

Here are a few thoughts to consider when organizing the content, job titles, job posting, and other information for your job candidates.

transcript

One of my pet peeves with healthcare career pages or sites is the fact that they assume that I have perfect knowledge of their organization.

Look, the fact that the majority of your applicants, in the upper 80%, are familiar with you, shouldn’t make any difference in how much detail you provide. You should treat every visitor to your career section as if they know absolutely nothing about you.

I mean, if I visit your hospital website, do they treat patients or potential patients as all-knowing, and just put a big banner on the homepage that says, “We’re open! Just come on down for healthcare!!”

Of course not.

So why would you treat candidates that way?

So here are a few thoughts to consider when organizing the content, job titles, job posting, and other information for your job candidates.

  1. Include name, address, and clinical services for each of your facilities. Describe what it is – hospital, clinic, physician groups, outpatient services. Who, what, and where. You want more informed candidates, then provide the details they need to be well-informed.
  2. Slim down your job titles. Keep it simple. If you feel you have to break out clinical roles for nurses and allied health professionals, so be it, but if you can get away with simple titles, please do it. When it comes to keyword searches that would benefit from the simplicity.
  3. Stop using floor names and such for units. No one knows where 3 South is and what they do. Take that out of the job title. Stick it in the job post and tell me what it is. MedSurg? Surgical Intensive Care? Peds? Name the department, not the floor.
  4. Write good job posts. Be clear about the requirements you have for any particular position, and write it in plain English. (you can read an article we did on writing better job posts here – https://rightjobnow.com/better-recruiting-starts-writing-better-job-posts)
  5. Always make sure that candidates can access information they need from anywhere on your career page or career site quickly and easily. Good information architecture is critical. And having easy to use site navigation is important too.
  6. Look, job candidates are different from patients. Don’t treat them the same. Set the career section apart from your patient site and focus on your recruitment marketing. The messages are entirely different for each audience. So why munge it all up together.

    Help job seekers learn about all you have to offer, and in the process, I bet they’ll be so impressed they’ll apply for a job. Focus on being a great storyteller.

    It’s a competitive market today for clinicians, and you need everything you can throw in your recruitment marketing arsenal to find the candidates you need. Start with the low-hanging fruit.

    Start with your career site and job search.

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